Make your own bone stock

Bone stock requires few ingredients—and a lot of time. But since much of it is passive for the cook, creating a pot of bone stock is the perfect winter weekend project and a great way to reclaim a tradition that fell victim to the rise of convenience foods.

Bone stock requires few ingredients—and a lot of time. But since much of it is passive for the cook, creating a pot of bone stock is the perfect winter weekend project and a great way to reclaim a tradition that fell victim to the rise of convenience foods.

Stock made from collagen-rich bones, known by most of us as bone broth, is still as popular as ever. Opinions range from approving to reverential. And few foods are as flavorful and satisfying.

Bone stock requires few ingredients—and a lot of time. But since much of it is passive for the cook, creating a pot of bone stock is the perfect winter weekend project and a great way to reclaim a tradition that fell victim to the rise of convenience foods.

Start with bones from your local butcher, using an equal ratio of joints, larger bones, and feet. Blanch the bones in simmering water for 20 minutes and drain. Then roast the bones at 450 degrees until they’re almost overdone. Place the bones back in the stock pot, scraping in the bits that are stuck to the bottom of the pan (soak in hot water to loosen them up).

Add enough water to just cover the bones along with some vinegar (about one tablespoon per pound of bones). Let it cook and cook, adding water and skimming as needed. A chicken stock will take 24 hours, a beef or veal broth closer to 48 hours.

About eight hours before it’s finished, add peeled onions and garlic. An hour before you take it off the heat, add celery tops and parsley. Cool quickly, adding ice and pouring into a shallow pan. Once cool, refrigerate or freeze and enjoy a rich base for soups, braises, and stews.

SQUARE WALNUT END GRAIN BUTCHER BLOCK 16 X 16 X 1.75

SQUARE WALNUT END GRAIN BUTCHER BLOCK 16 X 16 X 1.75

CUSTOM KOREAN CLEAVER

CUSTOM KOREAN CLEAVER